The True Story Of A Brave Dog In The Civil War, Sallie Ann Jarrett

   I’m going to tell you a story…
   A true story about a dog named Sallie Ann Jarrett.
   But we have to go back in time. The year is 1861. A Union regiment, the 11th Pennsylvania, had recently been organized and was training for the American Civil War.
   Being early in the conflict, local civilians would come out to watch the new soldiers march, drill, and train. Once such individual was an attractive, young woman named Sallie Ann. As you can imagine, the soldiers liked it when Sallie Ann stopped by.
   Well, one day, someone arrived with a basket. Inside the basket was a little, female pit bull puppy who was presented to the regiment as a gift.
   The soldiers named her Sallie Ann Jarrett after the popular young woman they liked and their original commanding officer, Colonel Phaon Jarrett.
   Little Sallie Ann was quite popular with the troops with her playful exuberance. Early on she would wind her way through the soldiers as they marched, but then she learned to join the commanding officer at the head of the column.
   In 1862, the regiment, under the command of Colonel Richard Coulter, headed south to join the war for real.
   And Sallie Ann went with them.
   The 11th Pennsylvania saw its first action at Cedar Mountain. As the muskets fired and bullets flew, Sallie Ann stayed at the front with her soldiers, for the 11th was her family. She apparently tried to bite Confederate bullets when they struck the ground.
   She saw more fighting. At the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day of the war, the soldiers tried to get her to stay behind, but Sallie Ann refused and remained with her regiment.
   She gave birth to puppies, who were sent north to families, but Sallie Ann continued on with the 11th.
   When the Army of the Potomac marched before President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, Sallie Ann was in her place at the head of her unit.
   In July of that year, large Union and Confederate armies ran into each other at Gettysburg, resulting in a brutal three day battle. The 11th Pennsylvania saw action on the first day, during which they suffered a number of killed and wounded. When Union forces retreated back through town to regroup on Cemetery Ridge, Sallie Ann got separated from the regiment. As the bloody battle raged for 2 more days, no one knew what had happened to her. Considering there were 51,000 casualties, many probably feared the worst.
   After the fighting ended, Union soldiers explored the devastated battlefield. When they arrived at the site where the 11th had fought on the first day, they found Sallie Ann.
   After getting separated, she had returned and stayed vigil over the dead and wounded members of her family, soldiers of the 11th Pennsylvania.
   In 1864, Sallie Ann was shot at the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse; though, she fortunately recovered.
   Then in February of 1865, Sallie Ann was sadly killed in action. Reportedly, several mourning soldiers buried her while the battle still raged. Finally, later that year, the terrible Civil War came to an end.
   Years passed by.
   In 1890, a monument was erected at Gettysburg honoring the 11th Pennsylvania. Veterans had demanded that Sallie Ann Jarrett be honored too.
   They got their wish.
   The monument consists of a Union soldier standing on top of a pedestal. On the front of the pedestal near the base, is the statue of a curled up dog, Sallie Ann Jarrett.
   In 1910, there was a reunion of surviving members of the regiment. They had their photograph taken with the monument behind them. If you look at the picture closely, you’ll notice 3 veterans are standing off to the right creating a gap. They did this so that Sallie Ann would be in the photo too, for if you zoom in, you can see the profile of her statue on the monument in the gap.
   So if you visit the Gettysburg Battlefield, stop by the monument and honor the brave little dog, Sallie Ann Jarrett.

1910 Reunion
Memorial to the 11th Pennsylvania at Gettysburg
Photo of Sallie Ann Jarrett

There Is Too Much Hate Permeating Society These Days

7-21-20
   There is way too much hate permeating society these days. Way too much.
   It seems to be coming from all around, like it’s oozing from everywhere.
   Unfortunately, hate is nothing new. It has been a part of human existence for as long as humans have been around.
   The reasons why a person hates can actually be quite complex and is often due to a combination of factors. Fear of people or things that are different or that an individual doesn’t understand is a common one. Lashing out and projecting against others because of insecurities about oneself is another. Influences from surrounding people, family, leaders, and organizations often play roles as well in encouraging and exacerbating hate. Also, hate frequently leads to more hate. Person A hates person B. Person B commonly responds back with their own version of hate.
   Sometimes, it seems almost contagious, and these days, we are seeing populist political leaders using and encouraging hate to increase their power and hold over followers. This sadly is nothing new as historical figures like Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, and Benito Mussolini used such tactics quite effectively in their rise to power and then desperate quests to keep that power.
   But it doesn’t have to be this way.
   People need to routinely take a good, hard look at themselves examining who they are, how they feel about things, and why. All should strive to recognize hate, or the stirrings of it, and then find ways to let it go.
   Yes, let it go.
   Imagine the world if more people opened their minds educating themselves, seeking out different points of view, and then learning to let go of their hate.
   Imagine.
   And you know what? It’s got to start somewhere.
   And yep, that means with you!

African American Hero From The American Civil War

   William Carney was born a slave in Norfolk, Virginia in 1840. His father, William Sr, escaped North via the Underground Railroad and after working hard, was able to buy freedom for the rest of his family. They settled in Massachusetts where young William learned to read and write, planning on becoming a minister.
   However, in 1863, 23 year old William Carney joined the 54th Massachusetts Black Regiment instead. He was now a soldier in the American Civil War.
   In July of that year, the 54th and other Union forces were gathered outside Charleston, South Carolina preparing to take part in the assault on Fort Wagner, one of the installations guarding Charleston Harbor.
   On the 18th, the 54th was taking cover behind sand dunes about 1000 yards from the fort. When nightfall arrived, the order was given.
   Advance.
   The 54th was leading the attack on Fort Wagner.
   After dressing their lines, the regiment moved across open ground under withering cannon and musket fire. Seeing the color bearer start to fall, Carney quickly dropped his gun and grabbed the flag moving to the front of the line. He and the 54th continued forward through a storm of bullets, cannonballs, and canister. Soldiers fell all around with terrible bloody wounds, but the regiment kept going with Carney at the front holding the American flag aloft.
   He crossed a ditch and clambered up the fort’s earthen wall. When Carney arrived at the top and looked around, he found himself surrounded by dead and wounded members of his battered, bloodied regiment.        
   At that moment, William Carney realized that in his area, he was the only one still standing.  
   Seeing Confederate forces advancing towards him, Carney worked his way back down the wall through the carnage and made it to the ditch that was now waist deep in water. Pausing there, he thought about his next course of action. As he rose up to get a better look around, William Carney was shot. A second bullet struck him shortly after. While Carney was painfully pushing his way towards friendly lines, he came upon a soldier from the 100th New York who asked if he was wounded. As Carney responded, a third bullet grazed his arm. The soldier came over to help him, offering to take the flag, but Carney wouldn’t let it go. Together the two men, one black and one white, struggled towards Union lines during which a fourth bullet grazed Carney’s head.
   When they made it back, he refused to give up the flag to anyone except another member of his regiment. Once they reached other survivors of the 54th, Carney said, “Boys, the old flag never touched the ground.”
   In 1900, William Carney was finally awarded The Medal of Honor.

John Quincy Adams, The Skinny Dipping President

  

   Yes, you heard me right! But first, let’s start at the beginning.
   John Quincy Adams was born in Braintree (now Quincy), Massachusetts in 1767. He was the eldest son of John and Abigail Adams, who were both very important figures in the early United States. His father was a member of the Continental Congress during the American Revolution, served as a diplomat in Europe, and became the 2nd American President. As a result, young John Quincy grew up among movers and shakers including some in European countries. He was very intelligent, learning multiple languages and was an avid reader. Apparently, he had hoped to pursue a career in writing; though, his future lay in politics.
   John Quincy Adams had a long career as a civil servant and politician. He served as a diplomat overseas, was a member of the United States Senate, became Secretary of State, and was the 6th President of the United States after which he had a long career as a member of the House of Representatives. As a matter of fact, he is the only person to serve in the House after being President.
   In many ways, he was ahead of his time. He despised the institution of slavery and was more sympathetic to the rights of Native Americans than many of his contemporaries. As much as he hated slavery and fought against it, John Quincy Adams predicted that the only way the terrible institution would come to an end would be if the Southern states ended it voluntarily or if there was a civil war. He also predicted that if there was a civil war, the president of the time would use war powers to end slavery. This is quite close to what actually happened since Abraham Lincoln used the Emancipation Proclamation to end slavery in the Confederate states.
   In 1797 London, Adams married Louisa Johnson, the daughter of the US consul to Britain. They had 3 sons and 1 daughter together. Tragically, two died as young men after battles with alcoholism. One possibly from suicide. John Quincy likely suffered from depression and had a serious disposition much of the time. In politics, he became well known for his oratory, giving powerful impassioned speeches. In fact, when his end finally came in 1848, he was giving a fiery speech in Congress when he collapsed from a stroke. He died two days later in the US Capitol Building.
   Obviously, John Quincy Adams spent many years living in Washington DC. He had a habit of getting up early in the predawn hours to walk around the city getting exercise when it was quiet and other people were still asleep. If the weather was good, he was known to swim in the Potomac River. In those days, when men swam in the river, they would remove their clothes and take a dip. Although in 1821 when the British Ambassador George Canning spotted then Secretary of State Adams in the water, he wasn’t entirely naked. Canning later wrote, “The Secretary of State was seen one morning at an early hour floating down the Potomac, with a black cap on his head and a pair of green goggles on his eyes.”
   So yes, John Quincy Adams, 6th President of the United States, would remove his clothes and skinny dip in the Potomac River! Not something you’d catch any modern president doing!
   So when you have a few minutes, perhaps learn about and remember the skinny dipping President of the United States, John Quincy Adams.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Quincy-Adams

https://shannonselin.com/2017/07/john-quincy-adams-swimming/

The True Story Of A Dog Named Stubby

   It all started on a day in 1917. The place was the Yale University campus in Connecticut where the 102nd Infantry Regiment was training in preparation to join the brutal trench warfare of World War 1 Europe.
   What made this day different from the others was how a stray mixed breed dog wandered in amidst the regiment, apparently making himself quite at home. He quickly won over the young soldiers, was named Stubby (due to his short tail), and found himself adopted by Private James Robert Conroy. 
   Stubby was very popular with the soldiers. He would apparently try to join them in some of the drills and reportedly learned to salute with his right paw.
   Finally, the time arrived to ship off to France and join the war for real.
   And yes, Stubby went with the regiment.
   Over the years, numerous stories and legends have been told about Stubby so that separating fact from fiction can be extremely difficult. One tale says that Conroy tried to smuggle Stubby over to Europe but got caught. The story goes on to say that when the commanding officer discovered what had happened, he was won over by a right paw salute. Great story, but is it true? We’ll likely never know.
   What does appear true is that Stubby kept up morale in the front lines and would warn the troops of gas attacks by barking and running through the trenches. Another brave feat was the way he would go into no man’s land between the American and German positions finding wounded soldiers and staying with them until medics arrived.
   Stubby was also known to wander, sometimes disappearing for days at a time. But he always found his way back to the 102nd and his owner, James Robert Conroy.
   The brave dog suffered multiple battle wounds, but was fortunate enough to survive the war, after which he became a celebrity. He had his photo taken with General John Pershing, commander of all US forces in Europe and became the mascot of Georgetown University, where Conroy studied law.
   Stubby passed away in 1926 in his owner’s arms. He was stuffed and eventually ended up with the Smithsonian Institution where the brave pooch is sometimes displayed.


  

Here’s Why Removing Confederate Statues And Changing Some Brands Is Needed

6-19-20
   Some people seem to think that the movements to remove Confederate statues from city parks or change brand names and images (like Uncle Ben’s Rice) is going too far.
   Well, it’s not going too far. And it’s not changing history either.
   It’s about being honest about the past and striving to make things better for all.
   Let’s go back in time for a bit.
   Since the founding of the United States, slavery had been a festering issue that was creating frustration, anger, and division. During the 1800s, as territories became states, there were bitter arguments and clashes over whether they would be a free or slave state. The South was worried that if too many states became free, the balance of power could shift in that direction, eventually threatening slavery itself.
   The Missouri Compromise of 1820 was part of the effort by the American government to maintain a balance of power between the free vs slave states by admitting Missouri into the Union as a slave state and Maine as free. This was done to try to prevent war.
   But the slavery issue continued bleeding and dividing the nation.
   When Abraham Lincoln, who was against slavery, became president, tensions boiled over. Southern states’ rights advocates decided to secede creating the Confederacy. They clearly did this in order to preserve the disgusting institution of slavery.
   So even though a Southern soldier might have gone to war with the idea that he was fighting for his home, he was also fighting to preserve slavery.
   Slavery.
   A horrible institution treating human beings as property. That is ultimately what Confederate soldiers were fighting for.
   Slavery.
   Something else to consider with regards to Confederate statues. Many were erected by white Americans with white supremacist attitudes as part of their efforts to quash Black Civil Rights movements.  This is also why the Confederate flag was included in multiple Southern state flags.  It was part of the campaigns by racist white Americans to oppress the African American population. To keep Black people “in their place.” That is truly sick when you think about it.
   Now, think about this: statues in city parks should honor people, movements, or organizations that the majority of the current population can agree deserve such treatment. Considering this country’s history, that is certainly not Confederate soldiers or the Confederate flag.
   That is why it is definitely time for change.
   A city park is not the place for a Confederate statue, and no state flag should include the Confederate flag. It’s the 21st Century folks!
  As to brand names and images like Uncle Ben’s Rice or Aunt Jemima Pancake Mix, they need to be changed too because they are based on grossly demeaning, racist stereotypes that were used by white Americans with racist attitudes in their desire to keep themselves in charge.
   It is time for positive change.
   Let’s learn from the past so as not to repeat the wrongs that have been done.
   We must embrace our diversity and be more accepting, understanding, tolerant, and supportive of everyone.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/aunt-jemima-millionaire/

The Border Between North And South Korea Is One Of The Most Tense And Heavily Fortified In The World

5-4-20
   On Sunday, North Korean soldiers apparently fired across the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) at a guard post on the southern side. South Korea says its soldiers issued a warning broadcast and then fired two shots back in return. No one on the southern side was injured.
   Did you know that the Korean DMZ is probably the most heavily fortified border in the world?
   It is.
   The Demilitarized Zone was established in 1953 when the Korean War came to end and runs across the Korean peninsula separating the Communist North from the Democratic South. It’s approximately 150 miles long and 2.5 miles wide running along the 38th parallel. An estimated 2 million mines are dispersed in or near the DMZ which is in addition to all the guard posts, fences, barbed wire, tank traps, artillery, combat vehicles, and hundreds of thousands of troops that line the entire border area.
   And guess what? This isn’t the first incident to occur there. Oh no. There have been scattered clashes occurring between the two sides since the end of the war including helicopters being shot down when they accidentally strayed across the border, engagements on water, and guard posts having firefights against each other.
   Panmunjom is a village that straddles the border itself. Here, North Korean and South Korean soldiers stare at each other day in and day out, sometimes with just feet separating them. There are 5 one story buildings, 3 of which are painted United Nations blue, that stand directly on the border line so that half is in the South and half is in the North. These buildings are where delegates can sit down at a table, that is also bisected by the border, for talks. When South Korean soldiers open the door to the North, they do so in pairs. One opens the door while the second holds on to him. They do this because there is genuine fear that North Korean soldiers might try to grab and abduct the first. That is how tense things are.
   Considering how dictatorial and ruthless the North Korean regime is, it doesn’t look like there will be any significant easing of tensions at the Korean DMZ anytime soon.

The True Story Of Movie Star Rin Tin Tin

   I wonder how many people know the true story of Rin Tin Tin. Sadly, these days, most probably don’t even know who he was. But in his day, Rin Tin Tin was a movie star!
   A canine movie star!
   Yep, you heard me right!
   It all started during the horrors of World War 1.
   The year was 1918 in the Lorraine part of France. Corporal Lee Duncan was an American soldier caught up in the bloody conflict. On September 15, his unit was investigating a bombed out kennel when they discovered among the wreckage a German Shepherd mother with a litter of 5 puppies.
   Duncan took two of the puppies, naming them Rin Tin Tin and Nanette, after a couple of puppets popular with French children. Sadly the others didn’t survive.
   Duncan realized how intelligent Nanette and Rinty (Rin Tin Tin’s nickname) were. He sought out the German Army Kennel Master, who had been captured, to learn more about the two and German Shepherds as a breed.
   Duncan started training them and was impressed with how quickly they took to it. After the war came to an end, Duncan was sent home aboard a ship across the Atlantic Ocean. Unfortunately, Nanette came down with distemper during the voyage and died.
   Only Rinty was left.
   Duncan took him back to Los Angeles where in 1922, Rinty began his movie career.
   He starred in some 2 dozen movies and is credited by many with saving Warner Bros Studio from bankruptcy. He also received the most votes for Best Actor for the First Academy Awards, though it was decided to give the award to a human instead.
   Rin Tin Tin passed away on August 10, 1932 in his front yard in the arms of famous actress Jean Harlow, who lived in the same neighborhood.

135th Aero Squadron with puppy believed to be Rin Tin Tin

The True Story Of A Dog In The Civil War, Sallie Ann Jarrett

I’m going to tell you a story…
A true story about a dog named Sallie Ann Jarrett.
But we have to go back in time. The year is 1861. A Union regiment, the 11th Pennsylvania, had recently been organized and was training for the American Civil War.
Being early in the conflict, local civilians would come out to watch the new soldiers march, drill, and train. Once such individual was an attractive, young woman named Sallie Ann. As you can imagine, the soldiers liked it when Sallie Ann stopped by.
Well, one day, someone arrived with a basket. Inside the basket was a little, female pit bull puppy who was presented to the regiment as a gift.
The soldiers named her Sallie Ann Jarrett after the popular young woman they liked and their original commanding officer, Colonel Phaon Jarrett.
Little Sallie Ann was quite popular with the troops with her playful exuberance. Early on she would wind her way through the soldiers as they marched, but then she learned to join the commanding officer at the head of the column.
In 1862, the regiment, under the command of Colonel Richard Coulter, headed south to join the war for real.
And Sallie Ann went with them.
The 11th Pennsylvania saw its first action at Cedar Mountain. As the muskets fired and bullets flew, Sallie Ann stayed at the front with her soldiers, for the 11th was her family. She apparently tried to bite Confederate bullets when they struck the ground.
She saw more fighting. At the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest single day of the war, the soldiers tried to get her to stay
behind, but Sallie Ann refused and remained with her regiment.
She gave birth to puppies, who were sent north to families, but Sallie Ann continued on with the 11th.
When the Army of the Potomac marched before President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, Sallie Ann was in her place at the head of her unit.
In July of that year, Union and Confederate armies clashed at Gettysburg. The 11th Pennsylvania saw action on the first day, during which they suffered killed and wounded. When Union forces retreated through town to regroup on Cemetery Ridge, Sallie Ann got separated from the regiment. As the bloody battle raged for 2 more days, no one knew what had happened to her. Considering there were 51,000 casualties, many probably feared the worst.
After the fighting ended, Union soldiers explored the devastated battlefield. When they arrived at the site where the 11th had fought on the first day, they found Sallie Ann.
After getting separated, she had returned and stayed vigil over the dead and wounded members of her family, soldiers of the 11th Pennsylvania.
In 1864, Sallie Ann was shot at the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse; though, she fortunately recovered.
Then in February of 1865, Sallie Ann was sadly killed in action. Reportedly, several mourning soldiers buried her while the battle still raged. Finally, later that year, the terrible Civil War came to an end.
Years passed by.
In 1890, a monument was erected at Gettysburg honoring the 11th Pennsylvania. Veterans had demanded that Sallie Ann Jarrett be honored too.
They got their wish.
The monument consists of a Union soldier standing on top of a pedestal. On the front of the pedestal near the base, is the statue of a curled up dog, Sallie Ann Jarrett.
In 1910, there was a reunion of surviving members of the regiment. They had their photograph taken with the monument behind them. If you look at the picture closely, you’ll notice 3 veterans are standing off to the right creating a gap. They did this so that Sallie Ann would be in the photo too, for if you zoom in, you can see the profile of her statue on the monument in the gap.
So if you visit the Gettysburg Battlefield, stop by the monument and honor the brave little dog, Sallie Ann Jarrett.

1910 Reunion